Wednesday, July 18, 2012

The BEST method EVER for tracing off patterns-IMO

I know some people don't buy Threads magazine, so this post is for them. In the recent issue of Threads, Kathleen Wagner of Seattle Washington wrote in a tip for tracing patterns that I think is the most brilliant thing ever. Ever. She won for the "best tip". Well Duh. I think she should win for the Best Tip Ever of All Time.

By now I am sure you are all sitting on the edge of your seats screaming at your 'puter. "What is it already?"  Here it is. She traces the pattern on the back of the pattern with a child's wax crayon,  and then IRONS the traced pattern onto pattern paper printed with light blue dots so grainline marking is unnecessary. I would use Swedish tracing paper or some of the roll of blank newsprint I am hoarding have on hand or whatever you use for your patterns. You could also use different colours of crayons for circles or whatever.


I'm not sure how well it would work for Burda, it would depend on how much of the wax comes off the paper after pressing with the iron.  You could test it and find out, if needed. If it worked, would this solve the issue of Burda patterns being somewhat difficult to trace? I haven't sewn with Burda magazine patterns yet (mostly because no one sells them where I live) so I don't know.

Is this idea as brilliant as I think it is? Tell me.

12 comments:

  1. Yup, that's inspired. :)

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  2. Dude! Yes! Definitely going to give this one a try, thanks! :-)

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  3. Interesting.. I 'trace' with an adjustable double tracing wheel and carbon paper. It's quick, accurate and instantly incorporates seam allowance. Also I can use cheapie media like old newspapers to trace onto. Not sure on whether crayons are the best-with glossy pattern sheets (Knipmode, Ottobre etc) it would melt the gloss off with the crayon. Also I don't like highlighter/ crayon etc on my patterns/ magazines. Still, interesting..

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  4. yup - I saw that too and immediately thought 'genius'!

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  5. I agree this seems a great idea. I usually use tracing vilene (you can see through that) and that only takes as long as tracing with the crayon. The pattern still has to be cut out, but so does the result from the crayon method.

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  6. I agree this seems a great idea. I usually use tracing vilene (you can see through that) and that only takes as long as tracing with the crayon. The pattern still has to be cut out, but so does the result from the crayon method.

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  7. That does seem like a pretty cool idea! I have a 25m roll of very translucent, thin plastic tableclothing that I use for tracing patterns; (when I can be bothered, that is). It works pretty good; was very cheap and is far sturdier than paper.

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  8. Shams, CG, Poppykettle, I am pleased you think so too.

    Perfect Nose, like I said I can't get Burda, but I have seen them, Ottobre, Knipmode and other magazines exist only as a myth for me, I have never seen any of them. But I agree a glossy finish paper would not work with this technique.

    Ozviking I have similar stuff, but I hate the shifting that always seems to happen when I trace.


    Carolyn, I have some of that plastic tablecloth stuff too, but the shifting drives me nuts. I think I am going to love this method because you are only working with one layer while doing the actual tracing. I also love this because the blank newsprint roll I bought isn't even close to traceable and now I can use it.

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  9. Hmm, it's not a bad idea but since I've discovered pattern tracing material (like interfacing without the sticky side), I've been tracing with pencil, moving the pattern underneath, and making changes right on the traced pattern. So this wouldn't work for me as a method, but it does sound pretty quick.

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  10. I love this! I'll definitely give it a go. :)

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  11. I was going try that spiffy idea but then realized it meant mucking up my precious Marcy Tilton pattern...... ;-O The crayon sits right here... I used the chalk wheel gadget I am now in love with.

    To avoid shifting during tracing use a long ruler A hip curve and french curve you can hold down a large space by putting pressure on the ruler that avoids that movement of the paper or pattern.

    I swear I am going to try the crayon.... on like a simplicity or kwik sew. ;-)

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  12. I found your blog when I was looking where to find Burda Style magazine. I am visiting Kelowna and just bought the November Burda Style (in German) and the Autumn/Winter No2 edition ( in English) at Illichmann Gourmet Foods. There are no issues left as of today but the December issue will likely be there soon and I am going back to check before I leave town. They were $10.95 each which is extremely reasonable. Check it out and enjoy Burda Style.

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